Jeff Pearlman

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The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 6—Kit Lathrop

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 6: Kit Lathrop

Defensive end•Nose tackle

Chicago Blitz (1983)

Arizona Wranglers (1984)

Arizona Outlaws (1985)

OK, so this is where my USFL geekdom comes out in full force.

Most people who know of the league cite Steve Young and Jim Kelly; Herschel Walker and Doug Flutie. Some folks remember the USFL for Donald Trump, others for George Allen, a few for Steve Spurrier and Walt Michaels.

Only the rarely of rare birds remembers Kit Lathrop.

A shame, this is.

From 1983-85, Lathrop was the best defensive lineman in the USFL. Neither the biggest nor the strongest (Lathrop player at 6-foot-5, 255 pounds), the former Arizona State standout came to the league after unremarkable cups of coffee with the Broncos and Packers, then several years off to serve as an assistant coach at Ventura Junior College and UNLV. One day, out of the blue, the Chicago Blitz called with a $28,500 offer alongside a $1,500 signing bonus. “I arrived in camp as fifth on the depth chart,” Lathrop told me. “Then the next practice I was third. Then I was a starter.”

A two-time All-USFL selection, Lathrop was a dominant run stopper who also managed to terrified quarterbacks. He had eight sacks with Chicago in 1983, 13 with the Arizona Wranglers in 1984, then another eight in an injury-plagued final USFL season with the Arizona Outlaws. The guy was impossible to budge from the line; the original fire hydrant before every other stubby interior defensive lineman was compared to a fire hydrant. “He was the best player in the league,” one coach told me. “I’m not sure anyone every appreciated it.”

When the USFL folded, Lathrop returned briefly to the NFL, playing with the Chiefs in 1986 and the Redskins a year later. Yet by then, his body was shot.

His USFL legend, though, was quite secure.

From Football for a Buck

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

Player No. 10: Luther Bradley

Player No. 9: Anthony Carter

Player No. 8: Gary Anderson

Player No. 7: Chuck Fusina

Player No. 6: Kit Lathrop

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 7—Chuck Fusina

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 7: Chuck Fusina

Quarterback

Philadelphia/Baltimore Stars (1983-85)

OK, so this is where things start getting really tricky.

Stars quarterback Chuck Fusina is ranked seventh. He could easily be ranked first. It all depends on how one views these things; on what one values. On the one hand, Chuck Fusina is the winningest quarterback in USFL history. He guided his team to all three league championship games, winning two of them. Plus, his statistics are really good. Fusina’s 66 career touchdowns are paired with 33 interceptions (this is at a time when far more passes were picked off). He ranks second in league history with 10,051 passing yards, just a tad behind Bobby Hebert.

And yet … there are arguments to be made against Fusina’s greatness. First, he was part of the USFL’s dominant franchise, overflowing with superb offensive linemen, a legendary halfback (Kelvin Bryant), a fleet of quality wide receivers and a meticulous attack. The Stars rarely asked Fusina to do anything dynamic. Just run the offense, keep the chains moving, don’t screw up.

So, well, I have him here. A strong, worthwhile seventh.

In NFL terms, Fusina is Chad Pennington. And, truly, I believe he could have been Chad Pennington had any teams given him a legitimate opportunity. Yet after spending three years backing up Doug Williams in Tampa Bay, then three years owning the USFL, Fusina received but a slight cup o’ Joe in Green Bay before his career ended.

Chuck Fusina: Not mind-blowing. Just damn good.

From Football for a Buck

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

Player No. 10: Luther Bradley

Player No. 9: Anthony Carter

Player No. 8: Gary Anderson

Player No. 7: Chuck Fusina

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 8—Gary Anderson

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 8: Gary Anderson

Halfback

Tampa Bay Bandits (1983-85)

This is going to sound a bit weird, but were Gary Anderson named, oh, Muku Lafafa or Zit Tollbooth, he’s spoken of in hushed terms and legendary adjectives.

Instead, he’s boring ol; Gary Anderson, and he’s largely forgotten.

That stinks.

The halfback out of Arkansas wasn’t quite as powerful as New Jersey’s Herschel Walker; wasn’t quite as soft-handed as Philadelphia’s Kelvin Bryant. Yet I’m not sure the USFL had another back who was that explosive, that electrifying coming out of the backfield.

Snagged by the San Diego Chargers with the 20th pick of the 1983 NFL Draft, Anderson failed to come to terms, then signed a lucrative deal with the Tampa Bay Bandits. Only, well, afterward he sued his agent, Jerry Argovitz, for directing him toward the USFL, and during the trial revealed that not only was he in the wrong league, he was also (gasp) functionally illiterate.

That said, a deal was a deal, and Anderson the Bandit kicked ass. He rushed for 516 yards and four touchdowns in a shortened 1983 season, but the following year led the USFL with 19 touchdowns while scampering for 1,008 yards. Then, in 1985, he demolished most past standards, charging toward 1,207 yards on 276 carries and scoring another 16 times.

“God, he was so talented,” Steve Spurrier, the Bandits coach, told me. “He was a 185-pound tailback who could run the draw, sweep, be put at flanker, wide receiver. He could catch out of the backfield and run with it. Lord, was he a good player. He had everything.”

Anderson ultimately went to the Chargers, then Tampa and Detroit, but his 3,409 rushing yards seem somewhat disappointing.

It was never the same.

From Football for a Buck …

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

Player No. 10: Luther Bradley

Player No. 9: Anthony Carter

Player No. 8: Gary Anderson

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 9—Anthony Carter

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 9: Anthony Carter

Wide receiver

Michigan Panthers (1983-84)

Oakland Invaders (1985)

Statistically speaking, Anthony Carter is not one of the Top 3 wide receivers in USFL history.

He trails Birmingham’s Jimmy Smith and Joey Walters of the Federals/Renegades in all categories. He’s behind Oakland’s Gordon Banks and Houston’s Richard Johnson in some others.

It doesn’t matter.

In his three USFL seasons, during which he caught 160 passes for 27 touchdowns, Carter averaged an absolutely preposterous 19 yards per reception. By comparison, Jerry Rice averaged more than 19 yards per catch one time—ever. Terrell Owens never did. Neither did Tim Brown, Marvin Harrison nor Reggie Wayne.

Truth be told, Carter was the USFL’s Rice. He was ridiculously fast, blindingly quick, blessed with cushiony hands and amazing separation skills. In Bobby Hebert, he was fortunate to have a talented young quarterback who could hit him with the deep throws. But, truth be told, Carter was the Panthers’ offense. Everything a defense did revolved around keeping one eye on the receiver. If he went wide left a safety followed. If he was sailing deep, half the secondary was following. Even when NFL scouts were dismissing the USFL as bush league, they all knew what the Panthers, then Invaders, had in Anthony Carter.

A stud.

All these decades later, Carter’s game-winning touchdown reception in the league’s first-ever title clash remains the USFL’s vintage moment. As the Panther crosses into the end zone, he raises his arms high into the air. All things are possible. All dreams can come true.

Carter wound up starring in the NFL, a very good—not all-time legendary—player.

Yet in the USFL, he was elite.

From Football for a Buck …

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

Player No. 10: Luther Bradley

Player No. 9: Anthony Carter

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 10—Luther Bradley

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 10: Luther Bradley

Cornerback

Chicago Blitz (1983)

Arizona Wranglers (1984)

Houston Gamblers (1985)

So I’m not sure there’s even been a more USFL-ish player than Luther Bradley, the former Notre Dame All-American who played four seasons with the Detroit Lions and one with the Houston Oilers before signing with the Chicago Blitz in 1983.

Bradley was the sort of defensive back fans love and coaches hate. What I mean is, he was Erik McMillan before Erik McMillan—a I-need-interceptions-more-than-I-need-food ballhawk who would take endless risks in pursuit of the football. At its best, that meant Bradley could gobble up footballs, as he did in college (his 17 interceptions remain the Irish all-time record). At its worst, that meant burners like Anthony Carter and Jojo Townsell streaking by with ease.

Because the USFL was a land of gamblers (and Gamblers), Bradley was right at home. And in an April 2, 1983 game against the Tampa Bay Bandits, Bradley intercepted a pro football record six passes. Six! He wound up with 12 for the season, then six more the following year as a Wrangler. In 1985, the USFL’s swan song, Bradley collected 12 more picks.

He is, with ease, the USFL’s all-time leader in the category.

And, by extension, an all-time USFL great.

Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

Player No. 10: Luther Bradley

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 11—John Corker

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 11: John Corker

Linebacker

Michigan Panthers (1984-85)

Memphis Showboats (1986)

In 1983, as a rookie with the Panthers after three NFL seasons as a Houston Oiler, John Corker compiled 28 sacks.

I need to say that again.

And again.

And again.

Twenty eight sacks. Twenty eight sacks. Twenty eig—

I don’t care that this was the USFL, or that the season was 18-games long. Twenty eight sacks is absolutely insane. He added eight more the following year, then 5 1/2 in an abbreviated run with the Showboats in 1985. Hell, his nickname was the Sackman. Even with Reggie White around, Corker was the USFL’s most feared and impactful pass rusher. He also happened to be a guy who, coming out of Oklahoma State, could have been an elite NFL performer. Then drugs and alcohol got in his way, and Corker struggled before finding a spot in the new endeavor.

Twenty eight sacks.

Absolutely unbelievable …

From Football for a Buck …

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

Player No. 11: John Corker

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 12—Reggie White

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I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 12: Reggie White

Defensive end

Memphis Showboats (1984-85)

I am biased.

But at least I admit I’m biased.

Reggie White is, arguably, the greatest player to emerge from the USFL. He’s certainly the greatest defensive player to emerge from the USFL. And, in his two seasons with the Memphis Showboats, White was a force, compiling 12 sacks as a rookie, then 11 1/2 the following year.

So why do I have the 6-foot-5, 291-pound future Hall of Fame outside of the Top 10? Well, three reasons. One, while White was tremendous with the Showboats, he wasn’t half the player he’d become in Philadelphia and Green Bay. Two, he was not particularly good against the run in the USFL. And third, he pretty much had one move in the mid-1980s—slug the living shit out of opposing linemen until they crumble.

And, indeed, that worked. But it wasn’t until reaching the NFL that White developed his dips, his spins, his twirls, his speed-power merging. Truth be told, Reggie White wasn’t even the USFL’s most-feared pass rusher. That was … well, keep reading this series. He’s coming in a few days.

Hence, Reggie White is stuck at No. 12.

With a bullet.

From Football for a Buck

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Player No. 12: Reggie White

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 13—Gary Zimmerman

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 1.05.26 PM

I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

Offensive tackle

Los Angeles Express (1984-85)

There’s a USFL trivia question that never fails, and it’s a simple one: Name the four players from the league to reach the Pro Football Hall of Fame …

Everyone gets Steve Young. Everyone gets Jim Kelly. Everyone gets Reggie White.

Very few get Gary Zimmerman.

Why? Because he was an offensive lineman—a big, powerful, bulldozing offensive lineman who said little and wouldn’t be recognized in the corner grocery. And yet, a very strong argument can be made that Zimmerman—a University of Oregon product selected by the Express in the first round of the 1984 USFL Draft—is the best player to emerge from the league. His 12-year NFL career included five first-team All-Pro nods and two second-team All-Pro nods. He was a member of the Super Bowl XXXII champion Broncos, and was named to the NFL’s 1980s and 1990s All-Decade teams.

So why is he only 13th on this list? First, because he only played two USFL seasons. And second, because while he was terrific, Zimmerman could look left and right on the Express offensive line and see a conga of stars. This was when the team thought itself to be rolling in dough, so studs like Mark Adickes and Derek Kennard were paid big bucks to also block for quarterback Steve Young and his merry band of weapons.

Ultimately, Zimmerman’s greatness developed as he went along.

But it began in the USFL.

From Football for a Buck

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Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Player No. 13: Gary Zimmerman

The 25 best players in USFL history: No. 14—Joey Walters

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 12.54.22 AM

I am counting down the top 25 players in USFL history, concluding with the announcement of the No. 1 guy on Sept. 10—the eve of the release date for Football for a Buck.

The list comes after years of writing and researching my book, as well as a lifetime of loving the long, lost spring football league.

There have been books throughout my career that were written because the moment was right. There have been books throughout my career that felt like pure labor (sorry, Roger Clemens). But Football for a Buckis pure passion. Everything about the USFL spoke to me. The colors. The uniforms. The nicknames. The stars. The scrubs. It felt real and gritty and authentic.

Hence, the book.

Hence, the list.

Also, a quick point: This has 0 to do with what the players later became. NFL accomplishments are insignificant here. It’s all about the USFL.

So, with no further ado …

No. 14: Joey Walters

Wide receiver

Washington Federals (1983-84)

Orlando Renegades (1985)

For much of its existence, the USFL suffered a crisis of quarterbacking.

Yes, the league gave us Jim Kelly and Steve Young. And, sure, the league featured NFL refugees like Doug Williams, Brian Sipe and Vince Evans. But throughout its three-year run, the USFL struggled to find wall-to-wall signal callers who could sling the ball.

No team faced greater difficulties than the Washington Federals-turned-Orlando Renegades.

From 1983-85, the organization’s best quarterback was probably Mike Hohensee, an undersized kid out of the University of Minnesota with a so-so arm. Otherwise, the club brought out a drug addict who lived in his car (Joe Gilliam), an NFL washout (Kim McQuilken) and a former Notre Dame wide receiver (Lou Pagley). In short, it was one near-embarrassment after another.

Which, in hindsight, makes Joey Walters all the more spectacular.

A 1977 Clemson product, Walters spent six years starring in the Canadian football League, catching as many as 102 balls with the 1982 Saskatchewan Roughriders. When the Washington Federals offered the opportunity to return to the United States, Walters jumped at it. He surely knew not that the franchise would be a joke; that drugs would fill the locker room; that half the players wouldn’t have made his CFL roster. Nope, Walters simply showed up and balled out.

That’s how, despite truly dreadful quarterbacking, he led the Federals with 63 catches for 959 yards in 1983, then—with even worse quarterbacking—caught 98 passes for 1,410 yards and 13 touchdowns a year later. The Feds relocated to Orlando for 1984, and while the throws were as misguided as ever, Walters brought in 58 more grabs for another 784 yards. He is the USFL’s second all-time leading receiver behind Jimmy Smith (who, in Cliff Stoudt, had the benefit of a real NFL quarterback).

Walters wasn’t particularly fast, and he only stood 5-foot-10.

But despite the obstacles, he played his ass off.

From Football for a Buck

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 1.08.54 AM

Player No. 25: Tim Spencer

Player No. 24: Chuck Clanton

Player No. 23: Maurice Carthon

Player No. 22: Marcus Marek

Player No. 21: Jimmy Smith

Player No. 20: John Reaves

Player No. 19: Richard Johnson

Player No. 18: Irv Eatman

Player No. 17: Peter Raeford

Player No. 16: Trumaine Johnson

Player No. 15: David Greenwood

Player No. 14: Joey Walters

Showtime Book
Love Me, Hate Me Barry Bonds Book
Sweetness Walter Peyton Book
The Bad Guys Won Book
The Rocket that Fell to Earth Book
Boys Will Be Boys Book

Once again, Jeff Pearlman has produced an exhaustively researched, elegantly written book that re-creates one of the most colorful and memorable teams of the modern era. No basketball fan's bookshelf will be complete without it.

— Seth Davis, author of Wooden: A Coach's Life